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Inception and Outlook on the Ukraine Crisis

Inception and Outlook on the Ukraine Crisis

Inception and Outlook on the Ukraine Crisis

Nearing its second year, the Ukraine crisis is drastically magnifying with bleak prospects of a mutual conclusion amongst the country’s citizens and with its relationship to Russia.  Violent roots going back decades, the issue fully materialized in November 2013 when Ukraine suffered from a financial crisis. Viktor Yanukovych, then President, had to make a decision between two choices:  reaching a deal with the European Union that would bolster trade (which would strengthen its ties with the EU) or taking out a 15 billion dollar loan from Russia. Yanukovych chose the latter, sparking public outcry and subsequently the Euromaidan, which removed him from power.  

Since then, chaos has erupted across Ukraine. Russia has annexed Crimea without Ukraine’s approval. Separatists have revolted in Luhansk and Donetsk. The death toll continues to rise higher than the recorded 6,000 fatalities in March 2015, according to the United Nations. Bombings, gunshots and other weapon-induced violence have, in other words, become a daily presence in Ukraine.

Many people view this multi-faceted crisis as solely a battle between pro-Russian separatists and pro-Ukrainian separatists. However, the trouble goes much deeper than that—the Ukraine crisis is also a fight against its long-standing participation in corruption. Take the reason why the Euromaidan and the Orange Revolution started in the first place. Notice the oligarchy. Moreover, socioeconomic and sociopolitical issues add another layer of complexity to the Ukraine crisis because Ukraine possesses a strong history with NATO —though, not as an ally—and faces issues with Russia over its pipelines. Russia, Europe’s premier exporter of gas, transports its gas through Ukrainian pipelines and has recently increased the price on gas deals with Ukraine.  


However, strong measures have been implemented by the United States and the European Union to attempt to persuade Russia into helping Ukraine’s situation. The US, who regulates the materials required for drilling into oil reserves, has severed its partnership with Russian oil companies such as Rosneft. It has also blacklisted Russian tycoons linked to the annexation of Crimea. It should be noted, however, that the efficacy of their sanctions is questionable because its narrow spectrum. Furthermore, certain countries in the EU, who rely entirely on Russia for gas, are hesitant to go to extreme lengths to sever their socioeconomic and sociopolitical relationships with Russia, according to BBC News. Thus, the possibility of reconciliation amongst Ukrainian citizens and between Ukraine and Russia is murky. Perhaps, foreign countries should find new means to help Ukraine.


Alice is currently a junior in high school, where she likes to involve herself in literary and ecological pursuits. Apart from being a member of her high school literary magazine, book and environmental club, she also serves as a Second Reader for Polyphony H.S., an international literary magazine for high school students.


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