CATEGORIES

AUTHORS

Why The “No More” Campaign Is So Important

Why The “No More” Campaign Is So Important

Why The “No More” Campaign Is So Important

While the Superbowl commercials usually get people talking, there was one specific ad that left its viewers speechless.

The “No More” ad, sponsored by the National Football League (NFL), showed the effects of a woman desperately trying to get help from domestic abuse. As the camera pans the scene, showing a sink full of dirty dishes, a messy rug, and remnants of what looks like an attack, a woman’s voice captures the hearts of everyone watching.

“I’d like to order a pizza,” she explains during her call. While this might seem like the typical call for lunch, she’s actually calling the police. A confused police officer asks for clarification, in which she can only safely respond with “yes” and “okay”, in order to protect her safety.

At the end of the commercial, the message is clear: when it’s hard to talk, it’s up to us to listen.

When the video was posted online on January 27th, it had hundreds of thousands of views, and even more discussions about the issue of domestic violence. President Barack Obama released a video on February 8th, 2015, explaining that it’s “On Us” to end the stigma of domestic violence. Twitter users from throughout the country went online to post their thoughts about the newly shed awareness, including one Twitter user saying, “The No More sexual assault and abuse commercial still make me cry every time I see it, God bless.” (@casypls).

According to statistics from SafeHorizon.org, 1 in 4 women will experience domestic abuse during her lifetime. What’s even more shocking is that domestic violence covers all scopes – mental, physical, and emotional abuse. Injustice does not discriminate, and it affects men and women of all race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or income.

As we look anxiously for a solution to help survivors of domestic violence, ads like this remind the USA of how far we have yet to go. For people trapped by the horrible realities of domestic violence, a seemingly-innocent call for pizza can not only get them out of a terrible situation, but save their life. In 2014, controversy in the NFL was stirred when Ray Rice was suspended from playing in the Baltimore Ravens after kicking his wife in a casino.


With their call to end domestic violence, a new flame of hope is being lit to help change the world for our girls.


Julia Schemmer is a senior from Norco High School, where she participates in five AP classes, is the president of the Female Empowerment Club and Link Crew, and publicist of Chinese Culture Club, American Cancer Society, and the FIDM Fashion Club. Aside from managing the communications at Her Culture, she is the founder of She Speaks Media and The Face of Cancer, editor for The Prospect Magazine, editor in chief of Motivation Daily, and contributor for the Huffington Post. Her future endeavors consist of becoming an international human rights lawyer, foreign correspondent, diplomat, and finally seeing the day where Leonardo DiCaprio wins an Oscar.


Female Soldier Decorated for Feminism?

Female Soldier Decorated for Feminism?

100 Years of Beauty

100 Years of Beauty