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Literary Sexism

Literary Sexism

Thanks to HerCulture follower and contributor, Mrs. Linda Isaacs, we recently read a story regarding J.K. Rowling's role in the literary industry and how her gender may just be the single factor in her originally-concealed identity.

The author of the magic potions and the flying brooms and Quidditch chose J.K. as the initials to her name, hiding behind letters that reflect no gender at all. But that's not the worst of it. In technical-author-writing-legal terms, the name of the author of her most recent book is, in fact, Robert Galbraith - a man's name.

Bustle.com commented:

Looking to avoid the intense scrutiny Rowling faced after releasing a book that was not Harry Potter, Rowling chose to publish a novel under a pseudonym instead, and enjoyed her anonymity until the story was leaked. 

Apparently, it was not Rowling's decision to do so. In fact, her publishers told her to publish Harry Potter under the name J.K. Rowling as to take away any sense of gender so that the male audience would find the books more appealing (and yes, the publishers felt that the magical books would only appeal to males - and young ones at that).

Though Rowling has claimed that taking the male pseudonym was a means for her to "take my writing persona as far away as possible from me," it makes us stop and think that, maybe, just maybe, she took the name in order to accommodate what she should be writing, rather than what she wants to write.

Sexism in publishing isn't only Rowling's fault. It's actually been a real issue for a while now. But it's not a mystery that Rowling is publishing some seriously awesome books that publishers tend to think will only sell if a man wrote them. The editor of her most recent book, The Cuckoo's Calling, even said, "I never would have thought a woman wrote that."

We shake our heads at you, Mr. Publisher Sir. Really? A woman could not write a book that riveting and exciting and thrilling? It's time to trash Galbraith and embrace the true Rowling.

What are your thoughts on sexism in the literary industry? Comment below.

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