The Culture of The Mowgli's

The Culture of The Mowgli's

The Mowgli’s are making waves not only in the entertainment industry, but in the progression of mankind. 

The group, who released their first single in 2010, has gained a loyal social media following, accruing 25k followers on Twitter and the highly coveted verified check mark. However, they haven’t let the new sense of fame and fortune to carry them away into careless deeds.

“[We’re most passionate about] human compassion,” explains singer Katie Jayne Earl. “We all come from pretty privileged lives. We have always been afforded basic human necessities and then some. A roof on our heads, food on our table, love in our lives. Maybe we simply feel blessed and aware that not everyone is so lucky. Maybe that’s what drives us to spread love wherever we can.” 

Their cultural awareness have led them to contribute to empowering organizations such as Charity Water, an international effort to bring clean drinking water into developing nations. They’ve also been known to perform at charity events, and to encourage others to be kind to one another.

The Mowgli’s constantly demonstrate a unique form of humility typically unheard of in the entertainment industry. When asked about what it’s like to be recognized in public, vocalist, guitarist and percussionist Colin Louis Dieden replied, “I think the first time someone noticed me, I was out to dinner with my mom. I felt kinda weird but obviously she loved it because she is a mom.”

In 2014, they had the unique opportunity to tour with big names such as American Authors, Andy Grammer, and Echosmith. Their sunny tunes are influenced by everyday life, love, and emotions. Vocalist and guitarist Josh Hogan believes that an epic duet would be with “Josh from Portugal the Man because I love his songs and I feel like we’re from the same planet.”

While the road to fame is by no means easy, The Mowgli’s reassure that it is indeed possible. “Don’t stop, be brave, follow your heart, remember who you are and what you stand for,” advises Earle. It’s clear that through the dedication of being involved in the global community and embracing positivity, that the Mongol’s themselves have followed their own advice to fame. 


Julia Schemmer, 16, lives in "Horsetown U.S.A" where she participates in several AP courses, nineteen clubs, musical theater and active community service. She loves Jesus, coffee, classic literature, and life in general. After high school, she wants to pursue being an international human rights lawyer.


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